Low FODMAP diet

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FODMAP is an acronym (abbreviation) referring to Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. These are complex names for a collection of molecules found in food, that can be poorly absorbed by some people.[1]

A Low FODMAP diet can improve symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).[1]

Theory[edit | edit source]

The FODMAP molecules are poorly absorbed in the small intestine of the digestive tract. These molecules then continue their journey along the digestive tract, arriving at the large intestine, where they act as a food source to the bacteria that live there normally. The bacteria then digest/ferment these FODMAPs and can cause symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome include abdominal bloating and distension, excess wind (flatulence), abdominal pain, nausea, changes in bowel habits (diarrhoea, constipation, or a combination of both), and other gastro-intestinal symptoms.[1]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

Journal articles are listed here.

Clinicians[edit | edit source]

Risks and safety[edit | edit source]

Costs and availability[edit | edit source]

Examples of low and high FODMAP foods[edit | edit source]

Food Category High FODMAP foods [2] Low FODMAP food alternatives
Vegetables Asparagus, artichokes, onions(all), leek bulb, garlic, legumes/pulses, sugar snap peas, onion and garlic salts, beetroot, Savoy cabbage, celery, sweet corn Alfalfa, bean sprouts, green beans, bok choy, capsicum (bell pepper), carrot, chives, fresh herbs, choy sum, cucumber, lettuce, tomato, zucchini
Fruits Apples, pears, mango, nashi pears, watermelon, nectarines, peaches, plums Banana, orange, mandarin, grapes, melon
Milk and dairy Cow’s milk, yoghurt, soft cheese, cream, custard, ice cream Lactose-free milk, lactose-free yoghurts, hard cheese
Protein sources Legumes/pulses Meats, fish, chicken, Tofu, tempeh
Breads and cereal Rye, wheat-containing breads, wheat-based cereals with dried fruit, wheat pasta Gluten-free bread and sourdough spelt bread, rice bubbles, oats, gluten-free pasta, rice, quinoa
Biscuits (cookies) and snacks Rye crackers, wheat-based biscuits Gluten-free biscuits, rice cakes, corn thins
Nuts and seeds Cashews, pistachios Almonds (<10 nuts), pumpkin seeds

Learn more[edit | edit source]

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References[edit | edit source]


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history