Human leukocyte antigen complex

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

The Human Leukocyte Antigen complex or HLA complex is a group of proteins that "helps the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria".[1][2] It is the human version of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), which is also found in certain non-human species.[1]

Autoimmune disease[edit | edit source]

HLA associations in the genes of patients are considered to be a classic indicator that is a disease is autoimmune disease in nature.[3]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

A number of different studies by Mella et al. in Norway have found associations between HLA genes and ME/CFS patients meeting the Canadian Consensus Criteria, suggesting ME/CFS may be an autoimmune illness.[3]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) - A set of genes responsible for a given person's immune response to potential threats. Specifically, HLA genes encode proteins which help the immune system to distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins which are made by foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses. The HLA complex can vary greatly from person to person, generating unique immune and allergic responses. (Learn more: mecfsresearchreview.me)

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.