Endorphin

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Endorphins are endogenous opioid neuropeptides produced by the central nervous system and the pituitary gland. They are most commonly associated with reduced pain and increased feelings of pleasure and euphoria, but they also exert control on the immune system, such as boosting the activity of natural killer cells.[1]

Low dose naltrexone has been shown to increase the secretion of beta-endorphin.

Notable studies[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Puente J, Maturana P, Miranda D, et al. Enhancement of human natural killer cell activity by opioid peptides: similar response to methionine-enkephalin and beta-endorphin. Brain Behav Immun. 1992 Mar;6(1):32-9.


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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history