Dikoma Shungu

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Dr Dikoma C. Shunga is a Professor of Professor of Physics in Radiology and member of the Center for Enervating NeuroImmune Disease at Cornell University in New York, the United States. His research focuses on developing advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI) methods to apply in clinical and biomedical research. He has used MRS to measure brain lactic acid, the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and metabolites in chronic fatigue syndrome.[1]. His work has been funded by the NIH and the Solve ME/CFS Initiative.

ME/CFS research[edit | edit source]

Raised lactic acid and lowered glutathone levels in the brain[edit | edit source]

In a series of three studies, Prof Shungu found high levels of lactic acid in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid and significant correlation between lactic acid levels and the severity of mental fatigue in ME/CFS patients. He later went on to discover levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reduced by 36% in brain tissue[2] and suggested oxidative stress was playing a role in ME/CFS.

Supplementation with N-Acetylcysteine[edit | edit source]

At the 2016 IACFS/ME confernce Dr Shungu presented evidence that supplementing patients with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) raised levels of glutathione in the brains of patients and their symptoms were improved.[3]

In late 2020, Dikoma Shungu registered a randomized clinical trial to determine the effects of NAC supplementation on ME/CFS patients with low glutathione levels, especially investigating any change in glutathione levels and oxidative stress.[4]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2008, Assessment of GABA and Glutamate/Glutamine at 3.0 T in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Major Depressive Disorder and Healthy Volunteers - (Full text)
  • 2008, Ventricular cerebrospinal fluid lactate is increased in CFS compared with generalized anxiety disorder: an in vivo 3.0 T 1H MRS imaging study[5] - (Full text)
  • 2010, Increased ventricular lactate in CFS measured by 1H MRS imaging at 3.0 T. II: comparison with major depressive disorder[6] - (Full text)
  • 2012, Increased ventricular lactate in chronic fatigue syndrome. III. Relationships to cortical glutathione and clinical symptoms implicate oxidative stress in disorder pathophysiology[2] - (Full text)
  • 2017, Elevations of ventricular lactate levels occur in both chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia[7] - (Full text)
  • 2017, Multimodal and simultaneous assessments of brain and spinal fluid abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome and the effects of psychiatric comorbidity[8] - (Full Text)

Online presence[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Weill Cornell Medical College; Dikoma Shungu
  2. 2.02.1 Shungu, Dikoma C.; Weiduschat, Nora; Murrough, James W.; Mao, Xiangling; Pillemer, Sarah; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Medow, Marvin S.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Stewart, Julian M. (Sep 2012). "Increased ventricular lactate in chronic fatigue syndrome. III. Relationships to cortical glutathione and clinical symptoms implicate oxidative stress in disorder pathophysiology". NMR in biomedicine. 25 (9): 1073–1087. doi:10.1002/nbm.2772. ISSN 0952-3480. PMC 3896084Freely accessible. PMID 22281935. 
  3. D Shungu; et al. (2016). "N-Acetylcysteine Alleviates Cortical Glutathione Deficit and Improves Symptoms in CFS: An In Vivo Validation Study using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy". IACFS/ME Syllabus. p. 35. 
  4. "Assessment of N-Acetylcysteine as Therapy for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrom". clinicaltrials.gov. Retrieved Sep 11, 2020. 
  5. Mathew, Sanjay J.; Mao, Xiangling; Keegan, Kathryn A.; Levine, Susan M.; Smith, Eric L. P.; Heier, Linda A.; Otcheretko, Viktor; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Shungu, Dikoma C. (2009). "Ventricular cerebrospinal fluid lactate is increased in chronic fatigue syndrome compared with generalized anxiety disorder: an in vivo 3.0 T 1H MRS imaging study". NMR in Biomedicine. 22 (3): 251–258. doi:10.1002/nbm.1315. ISSN 1099-1492. 
  6. Murrough, James W.; Mao, Xiangling; Collins, Katherine A.; Kelly, Chris; Andrade, Gizely; Nestadt, Paul; Levine, Susan M.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Shungu, Dikoma C. (2010). "Increased ventricular lactate in chronic fatigue syndrome measured by 1H MRS imaging at 3.0 T. II: comparison with major depressive disorder". NMR in Biomedicine. 23 (6): 643–650. doi:10.1002/nbm.1512. ISSN 1099-1492. 
  7. Natelson, Benjamin; Vu, Diana; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Mao, Xiangling; Blate, Michelle; Kang, Guoxin; Soto, Eli; Tolga Kapusuz, Tolga; Shungu, Dikoma (2017), "Elevations of ventricular lactate levels occur in both chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 5 (1): 15-20, doi:10.1080/21641846.2017.1280114, PMC 5754037Freely accessible, PMID 29308330 
  8. Natelson, Benjamin; Mao, Xiangling; Stegner, Aaron J; Lange, Gudrun; Vu, Diana; Blate, Michelle; Kang, Guoxin; Soto, Eli; Kapusuz, Tolga; Shungu, Dikoma C (2017), "Multimodal and simultaneous assessments of brain and spinal fluid abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome and the effects of psychiatric comorbidity", Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 375: 411-416, doi:10.1016/j.jns.2017.02.046 

metabolite - A chemical compound produced by, or involved in, metabolism. The term is often used to refer to the degradation products of drugs in the body.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

glutamate (Glu) - Glutamate is one of the amino acids used by the body to make proteins. It is a salt or ester of glutamic acid, and the terms glutamate and glutamic acid are often used interchangeably. It also functions as the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.