Delayed onset muscle soreness

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Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) refers to next day muscle soreness which comes 24-48 hours after exercise. Peak soreness is at 48 - 72 h post-exercise. Athletes will experience DOMS after high intensity exercise work-outs. At low intensity exercise/work-outs the athlete will rarely experience soreness. Lay public believes lactate production is causing DOMS, but this is not correct. Lactate removal from muscles is rapid, typical 60-120 minutes after exercise. The cause of DOMS is microscopic injury to muscle fibres which leads to inflammation.


The damage to muscle cells triggers an inflammatory response which involves neutrophils and macrophages. These cells removes the damaged muscle tissue and release enzymes. The muscle fibers are then repaired.

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

Notable articles[edit | edit source]

  • 2018, Advances in Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS): Part I: Pathogenesis and Diagnostics[1] - (Abstract)
  • 2019, Advances in Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) - Part II: Treatment and Prevention[2] - (Abstract)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Hotfiel, Thilo; Freiwald, Jürgen; Hoppe, Matthias; Lutter, Christoph; Forst, Raimund; Grim, Casper; Bloch, Wilhelm; Hüttel, Moritz; Heiss, Rafael (Dec 2018). "Advances in Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS): Part I: Pathogenesis and Diagnostics". Sportverletzung · Sportschaden (in Deutsch). 32 (04): 243–250. doi:10.1055/a-0753-1884. ISSN 0932-0555. 
  2. Heiss, Rafael; Lutter, Christoph; Freiwald, Jürgen; Hoppe, Matthias; Grim, Casper; Poettgen, Klaus; Forst, Raimund; Bloch, Wilhelm; Hüttel, Moritz (Mar 2019). "Advances in Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) – Part II: Treatment and Prevention". Sportverletzung · Sportschaden (in Deutsch). 33 (01): 21–29. doi:10.1055/a-0810-3516. ISSN 0932-0555. 

enzyme - a substance produced by a living organism which acts as a catalyst to bring about a specific biochemical reaction.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.