Citric acid cycle

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

Citric acid cycle

Simply put, the Citric acid cycle/Krebs cycle/TCA cycle is a series of enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions that form a key part of aerobic respiration in cells. This work takes place inside the mitochondria.

A recent paper started to define how and why people with ME (pwME) have poorly functioning cellular respiration[1]while a review of published papers [2] added empirical evidence of a relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and fatigue.

According to Ron Davis, speaking at the 2016 IACFS/ME conference, ""ME/CFS patients have a marked decrease in some of the Citric Acid Cycle metabolites while mitochondrial mutations generally cause an increase."[3]


Learn more[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. https://insight.jci.org/articles/view/89376
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4136529/
  3. https://www.facebook.com/OpenMedicineFoundation/photos/a.332007933570301.63974.309364692501292/947648405339581/


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history