Brian Hughes

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Brian Hughes

Brian M. Hughes, Ph.D., is a specialist in stress psychophysiology and a Professor of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.[1] He has written methodological critiques of the PACE Trial and other ME research, as well as conducting empirical research on treatment harm in National Health Service specialist ME centres in England.[2] He is a member of the Science Advisory Board of DecodeME[3], a UK-based study to investigate DNA profiles of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome. He is also a member of the Republic of Ireland's National Working Group on ME, administered by Ireland's Health Service Executive, and an Advisor to the Northern Irish charity, Hope 4 ME & Fibro NI.[4]

Hughes's work specialises in stress psychophysiology, health psychology, the public understanding of psychology and science, and the application of psychology to social issues. A prominent advocate for scientific psychology, evidence-based policy, and the role of psychology in society, he writes widely on the psychology of empiricism and of empirically disputable claims, especially as they pertain to science, health, medicine, and politics.[5]

He is currently chairing a global research team on behalf of the International Prader-Willi Syndrome Organisation (IPWSO).[6] He is Associate Editor of the International Journal of Psychophysiology[7] and a member of the inaugural Editorial Board of J-STAR: Journal of Stress, Trauma, Anxiety and Resilience.[8] From 2014 to 2016 he served as President of the International Stress and Anxiety Research Society.[9] A past President of the Psychological Society of Ireland,[10] he currently sits on the PSI's Science and Public Policy Committee.[11] 

Education[edit | edit source]

  • 1993, B.A. degree in Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway[12]
  • 1998, Ph.D. degree in Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway[12]
  • 2009, Ed.M. degree in Science Education, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, US[12]

Relevant Books[edit | edit source]

  • 2018, Psychology in Crisis[13]
  • 2016, Rethinking Psychology: Good Science, Bad Science, Pseudoscience[14]

Talks and interviews on ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Articles on ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

PACE trial A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

stress Stress can by either physical or psychological, or both. Stress is either 1) a state of emotional or psychological strain or 2) the physical stress (pressure or tension) that a physical object such the human body is placed under, e.g., a stress test is a medical test that monitors the cardiovascular system during strenuous exercise.

β β / Β. Greek letter beta (symbol), equivalent to "b".

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.