Brian Hughes

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Brian Hughes

Brian M. Hughes, Ph.D., is a specialist in stress psychophysiology and a Professor of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.[1] He has written methodological critiques of the PACE Trial and other ME research, as well as conducting empirical research on treatment harm in National Health Service specialist ME centres in England.[2] He is currently a member of the Republic of Ireland's National Working Group on ME, administered by Ireland's Health Service Executive. He is also an Advisor to the Northern Irish charity, Hope 4 ME & Fibro NI.[3]

Education[edit | edit source]

  • 1993, B.A. degree in Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway[4]
  • 1998, Ph.D. degree in Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway[4]
  • 2009, Ed.M. degree in Science Education, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, US[4]

Relevant Books[edit | edit source]

  • 2018, Psychology in Crisis[5]
  • 2016, Rethinking Psychology: Good Science, Bad Science, Pseudoscience[6]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

  • September 2019, Keynote Lecture, Hope 4 ME & Fibro NI Annual Conference, Belfast, Northern Ireland; Speech title: Off the PACE and not NICE: Challenges facing evidence-based practice in ME/CFS[4]
  • October 2019, Keynote Lecture, Sheffield ME and Fibromyalgia Group Autumn Conference, Sheffield, UK; Speech title: Controversies and cock-ups in ME research: The role of human failings[4]

Articles[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.