Abnormal neurovascular coupling

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Neurovascular coupling (NVC) refers to the "regulation of cerebral blood flow to match brain activity, which is critically important for normal brain function".[1]Abnormal neurovascular coupling is a hypothesis being investigated to find out if it is underpinning cause of chronic fatigue syndrome. In 2019, Dr Zack Shan was awarded a grant to research neurovascular coupling in CFS.[1]

Theory[edit | edit source]

According to Stewart et al. (2012) the cerebral perfusion may be contributing to the brain fog (neurocognitive dysfunction) found in patients with CFS may POTS.[2][3]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

Treatment[edit | edit source]

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Learn more[edit | edit source]

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cerebral blood flow (CBF) - the amount of blood that goes through the arterial tree in the brain in a given amount of time

cerebral blood flow (CBF) - the amount of blood that goes through the arterial tree in the brain in a given amount of time

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.